Current therapeutic information from Canadian sources and the CPSBC Library

Submitted by Karen MacDonell

Will corticosteroids reduce mortality in community-acquired pneumonia? Is levonorgestrel intrauterine system effective for dysmenorrhea? What are the roles of stretching and magnesium supplementation for leg cramps in pregnancy? These disparate therapeutic questions reflect the diversity of clinical challenges rural physicians face daily. These questions have something in common: they are identified in RxTx as new developments in pharmacological management. RxTx is the new interface to a familiar pair of Canadian therapeutic resources: the e-CPS (Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties) and Therapeutic Choices, and is available for free to all physicians in BC through the College of Physicians and Surgeons of BC library website.

The e-CPS is an online pharmacopeia of Canadian-specific drug information, comprising Health Canada-approved drug monographs from manufacturers and evidence-based monographs from the Canadian Pharmacists Association, and includes links to Health Canada safety advisories and warnings. The e-CPS is kept current, with 55% of content being updated each year. The Therapeutic Choices component of RxTx is familiar to many rural physicians and has proven over the years to be a trusted support for pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment decisions (it’s now renamed Compendium of Therapeutic Choices). Covering over 200 common medical conditions, it offers evidence-based, peer-reviewed practical guidance and is a one-of-a-kind source of continuously updated therapeutic information for the Canadian context.

For free access RxTx, go to the College library’s “What’s New” section at https://www.cpsbc.ca/library or find the RxTx link on the Point of Care and Drug Tools page at https://www.cpsbc.ca/library/search-materials/point-of-care-drug-tools. A caveat: the College library has 10 concurrent seats so there is a chance of a “busy signal” during times of heavy use.

So often, the nuances of a particular patient’s situation are not well reflected in summary resources like RxTx. As a service to all BC physicians, College librarians have expertise in conducting precise and comprehensive literature searches and filtering the often voluminous results for the highest levels of evidence available on a particular clinical question. Whether you need the results quickly or have time to spare, the librarians will work to your schedule. What do you need to know? Contact the College library from Monday to Friday, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm, via email at medlib@cpsbc.ca, webform at https://www.cpsbc.ca/library/services-hours/make-request or call us at 604-733-6671.